Posts Tagged ‘interactive technology’

Novartis Interactive Stand Augmented Reality

November 10th, 2011 by NearInteraction

An interactive Augmented Reality experience for Novartis Oncology Portugal, produced by NearInteraction, in partnership with BUG Group.


Urban Apps: when meaningful ideas connect communities with interactive technology.

February 10th, 2011 by NearInteraction

“… I honestly think that the ideas we came up with could not have been produced by a conventional method. I think that the process led to some real originality – reaching bits of the mind that other methods cannot reach. Fascinating stuff as I suspected – but having experienced it I am now sold!”

“The storytelling approach to exploring solutions was great. Your model pushed us to get into the detail of our characters and places and really brought out the creative side of our group.  The depth of the characterisation helped us understand the situation.  The creative thinking around the narrative opened us up to more creative solutions for the App/product.  The storytelling enabled people from different professional backgrounds to develop a shared language, moving beyond our professional boundaries and exclusive language. Consider yourselves to have designed a really successful model.  I’m certainly going to use it again to explore a few projects I’m working on.”

A one-day workshop in London exploring the possibilities of merging interactive technology with community-led projects using NearInteraction’s NearLab’s unique collection of tools, probes and thought-provokers to inform and facilitate the innovation process. In the form of sets of cards, flash sets and scenario sheets, these are designed to operate on principles that encourage creativity and collective ownership, allowing the users the ability to be intuitive, recognise patterns, and explore the full potential.

The series of 3 workshops utilise the combined intelligence of the participating group, and facilitated with “learning together by doing” practices, including facilitated brainstorms, curated problem solving exercises, experience-based-learning, case methods and physical prototyping sessions, resulting in the generation of valuable, tangible outcomes.

Urban Apps: when meaningful ideas connect communities with interactive technology Workshop details here


NearInteraction partners with the Ministry of Culture leading the future…

September 30th, 2010 by NearInteraction

This September saw NearInteraction showcasing several technological pieces on behalf of the Ministry of Culture of Portugal at the technology fair “Portugal Tecnológico 2010″, the nation’s largest technology and innovation show, held at the Feira Internacional de Lisboa (FIL) exhibition centre.

Welcoming in the new wave…

Using a gesturally guided installation to showcase MatrizPix, an information system responsible for the management of images and archives of the Instituto dos Museus e da Conservação, was NearInteraction’s first choice to relay a physical exploring experience to the viewer whilst browsing the archive of digitalised files.

Posting the freedom of artistic creation…

Highlighting the works produced by the arts residencies represented by DGARTES, (a Direcção-Geral das Artes) NearInteraction’s object recognition installation reveals documentary style videos activated by postcards held up to the monitor.



Keeping touch with history…

NearInteraction created a multi-layered multi-touch table visually showcasing the processes that are represented by DGARQ, (a Direcção Geral de Arquivos) the coordinating body of the national archives which overlooks in all forms and mediums of archiving throughout the country. Focused on areas such as network and file systems, the safeguarding of assets, classifications, preservation of documents and the dissemination of information, this particular multi-touch table focused on the Torre de Tombo site.

By making use of interactive technology to relay a virtual experience to all the various aspects represented by the Ministry of Culture, NearInteraction’s portfolio of works exhibited at FIL, were accessible to both professionals and the public at large, allowing the Ministry of Culture to play a memorable part.