Archive for the ‘Georeferencing’ Category

Bluetooth ‘Tile’ allows you to find lost keys, bikes, dogs, anything really

August 3rd, 2013 by NearInteraction

Bluetooth 'Tile' allows you to find lost keys, bikes, dogs, anything really - Jason O'Grady

Tile (@TheTileApp) is an absolutely brilliant hardware device that can be attached to keys (or just about anything) so that you can locate them when lost. Tiles measures 36mm x 36mm x 4.2mm (or about the size of a matchbook), uses Bluetooth 4.0 (low energy) and will be compatible with iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPad Mini, iPad 3rd and 4th generation, and iPod Touch 5th generation. (Sorry Android users).

Bluetooth 4.0 is a brilliant choice because the built-in battery lasts about a year and doesn’t require recharging. While GPS would be ideal, it suffers from heavy battery consumption (less than a day, typically) and WiFi requires open hotspot access.

The Tile iOS app (not yet available) allows your to find a Tile by telling you how close you are to it. You can see yourself getting closer and further away from the Tile when within a 50 – 150ft range via the iOS app. The app logs the last location it saw your Tile (via GPS) giving you a good starting point. Tile also includes a built-in speaker, so you can make it emit a tone when you’re getting close.

But it’s the Tile service that makes it compelling. It uses a crowd-sourced model so that you still have a good chance of finding your Tile (when it’s attached to a dog or your MacBook, for example) even when it travels out of its 150-foot (Bluetooth) range. It’s like having the world help you locate your lost item. You can track a Tile by seeing when it’s identified by other Tile users.

Obviously the service requires a large user base to be effective (and may not work in less populated areas) but it’s a no brainer in large metros. And something tells me that the service will gain critical mass quickly.

Even though you’re helping find other people’s Tiles with your iPhone, the company insists that it takes your security seriously. Other Tile users cannot search for your Tiles (or your iPhone) for example and only you and the Tile users you’ve explicitly shared your Tiles with can search for your Tiles.

A single Tile can be pre-ordered for $19 and quantities of four or higher cost around $14 each and will ship in “winter 2013/14″ according to the developers (SRP will be $25 post launch). I pre-ordered eight (there’s a limit of 10 Tiles per account) so that I can attach them to all of my devices and maybe a few non-gadgets as well.

How much would you pay to find your keys in a crunch? What about your MacBook?YouTube Preview Image

Source: zdnet


Nearest Tube Augmented Reality App for iPhone 3GS by Acrossair

July 8th, 2009 by NearInteraction

Nearest Tube developed by Acrossair one of the first augmented reality apps to go live in the iPhone AppStore. This amazing new application tells Londoners where their nearest tube station is via their iPhones video function.

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When you load the app, holding it flat, all 13 lines of the London underground are displayed in coloured arrows. By tilting the phone upwards, you will see the nearest stations: what direction they are in relation to your location, how many kilometres and miles away they are and what tube lines they are on. If you continue to tilt the phone upwards, you will see stations further away, as stacked icons. Only available to Apple iPhone 3GS users.


Layar – first mobile augmented reality browser

June 30th, 2009 by NearInteraction
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Layar developed by Sprxmobile, combines GPS, camera, and compass to identify your surroundings and overlay information on screen, in real time. It is available for Android now and it will be available for iPhone soon, but exclusively for the 3GS. The reason is that Layar needs a compass to work.


iPhone game gets kids into the (hidden) park

June 25th, 2009 by NearInteraction

Released early this month by Australian developer Bulpadok, The Hidden Park is a computer game for young families that makes the most of the iPhone’s features as it leads children into a fantasy world of trolls, fairies and genies. Families begin by downloading the app from Apple’s App Store for USD 6.99 and then heading to a nearby park—currently, the game supports a select group of parks in nine major cities around the world, including New York, London, Tokyo and Sydney. From there, children navigate their way through the real park by following a magical map that reveals where mystical creatures live. As kids move past landmarks in the park, the map tells them where to go next, with puzzles and riddles to solve in order to save the park from greedy developers. Children also take photos of various landmarks—and of the magical creatures who are said to live nearby—and can store those photos in a gallery for an album of their adventure that day.

Taking full advantage of Apple’s technology, the Hidden Park uses the iPhone’s A-GPS feature to accurately pinpoint each player’s movements within the park and plot them against the interactive map that forms the heart of the game, for example. Through Location Based Services (LBS) technology, the game triggers particular animations and tasks as the user reaches key points along their journey. The phone’s accelerometer, meanwhile, allows users to shake the device to scatter mystical characters over any photographed image. The Hidden Park was created in collaboration with WSP Environmental. And while the game is currently focused on a set of key major parks, it can be adapted to others—in fact, the company is now working on a park builder that will allow parents to set up the game in their local park and share it with other parents. In the meantime, Bulpadok is also accepting nominations for additional parks to support in the game.

via Springwise here


Microsoft Surface Demo: Falcon Eye by Infusion

May 26th, 2009 by NearInteraction
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